Food Labelling Regulations Guide

This food labelling regulations guide contains information on the UK’s organic, nutrition, and allergen labelling requirements from the most recent updates. In addition, we discuss the new upcoming food labelling legislation, which is referred to as Natasha’s Law. Before going further into the article it may be worth you making yourself familiar with the different types of labels e.g. Embossed Labels.

Allergen Labelling

Whenever an item of pre-packaged food contains one or more of the 14 named allergens, the food packaging label must emphasise the allergenic ingredients. The information must be in one place so that it can be easily identified.

Currently, all foods that are made on and packed on-site, like those that are sold in cafes and delis, are not required to have labelling on the packages, as long as customers are told that they can ask for information on the allergens. However, with Natasha’s Law coming into full force in 2021, businesses are now required for their food to be labelled with a complete list of all of the ingredients contained in food like sandwiches that are made on their premises.

What is Natasha’s Law?

This new food labelling legislation came into full force in 2021 in England, with other nations expected to have similar arrangements that result in a UK-wide approach. The law was created after Natasha Ednan-Laperouse, a 15-year-old girl, died after suffering a fatal allergic reaction to a baguette containing sesame seeds. The enforcement of Natasha’s law will require pre-packed food that s made and sold on the premises to be labelled by businesses containing a complete list of all of the ingredients, including the allergens.

Currently, guidance is being developed by the Food Standards Agency (FSA) on the list of foods that Natasha’s Law will be applicable to. It was due to be published on 1st October 2019, to give a two-year transition period to businesses to prepare for the new requirements.

When Should Precautionary Allergen Labelling Be Used?

Food allergen labelling helps to prevent individuals with food intolerances and allergies from eating food that might cause a serious allergic reaction (anaphylaxis) or upset stomach.

So, if you make and package biscuits at a deli, stickers can be created to place on the back. That way your customers will know which ingredients it contains and check for any allergenic contents.

Named Allergens List

There are a total of 14 named allergens. So if any of them are contained in your product or it was made in a place where any named allergens are also made, then that must be stated on your product packaging. The following are the named allergens:

Named Allergens List

There are a total of 14 named allergens. So if any of them are contained in your product or it was made in a place where any named allergens are also made, then that must be stated on your product packaging. The following are the named allergens:

  • Sulphites and sulphur dioxide at levels over 10 ml per litre or 10mg per kg
  • Soybeans
  • Sesame seeds
  • Peanuts
  • Nuts
  • Mustard
  • Milk
  • Molluscs
  • Lupin
  • Fish
  • Eggs
  • Crustaceans
  • Cereals that contain gluten
  • Celeriac and celery

2016 Nutrition Labelling

It became mandatory in 2016 for companies to have nutritional information displayed on the back of their prepacked food items. The nutrition requirements are not applicable to food supplements or natural mineral waters. There are separate directives governing them.

PARNUT foods are made to meet specific nutritional requirements like total diet and meal replacement foods, formula and baby food, and medical food products. They have their own specific nutritional rules.

Pre-packaged foods all need to have nutritional information contained on the back of their packaging. It can also be voluntarily repeated on the front of the package. The goal is to make it possible for consumers to make healthier decisions and better understand what they are eating.

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